Index by Subject

How are People Saved? A Study of Galatians 3

The question, “How are people saved from the consequences of their sins,” is answered in Galatians chapter 3.  God revealed to Abraham that justification is by faith far before doctrines such as circumcision, Calvinism, Mormonism, Islam, or denominational-ism in general came to be.  When someone tells you that you must “Say the sinner’s prayer” or “Accept Jesus into your heart to be saved” know that before these doctrines came to exist the word of God said, “Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned unto him for righteousness” (Galatians 3:6).  All who emulate the faith of Abraham today are made righteous by the blood of Christ.  Galatians chapter 3 demands that we understand the faith of Abraham that we too can be justified.  Secondly, Galatians 3 demands that we respect the authorized word of God and never change it by adding or subtracting from it. Continue reading » How are People Saved? A Study of Galatians 3

Come Out and Be Separate

The passage begins memorably–“Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers.”

There is a spiritual danger in being linked to unbelievers, whether they be avowed atheists, practical infidels who claim conviction but live wickedly, or those who believe in God, but reject the authoritative nature of his word. Even as the inspired writer condemns being yoked to unbelievers, he offers a remedy–“Come out from among them and be separate” (2 Corinthians 6:14-18).

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Editorial: Sanctification

God is Holy.  The Psalmist proclaimed, “Exalt the Lord our God, And worship at His holy hill; for the Lord our God is holy” (Psalm 99:9).

Because God is holy, supplicants who approach Him must be holy as well.  Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, profaned themselves before God when they offered up strange fire by way of sacrifice.  In punishment, God took their lives. “And Moses said to Aaron, ‘This is what the Lord spoke, saying:  “By those who come near me I must be regarded as holy; and before all people I must be glorified.”’  So Aaron held his peace” (Leviticus 10:3).

This call to holiness is fully realized in the term sanctification.  The term sanctification is used, as pointed out by Vine, of (a) separation to God; (b) the course of life befitting those so separated. (pg. 317).

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Sanctification

God is Holy.  The Psalmist proclaimed, “Exalt the Lord our God, And worship at His holy hill; for the Lord our God is holy” (Psalm 99:9).

Because God is holy, supplicants who approach Him must be holy as well.  Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, profaned themselves before God when they offered up strange fire by way of sacrifice.  In punishment, God took their lives.  “And Moses said to Aaron, ‘This is what the Lord spoke, saying:  “By those who come near me I must be regarded as holy; and before all people I must be glorified.”’  So Aaron held his peace” (Leviticus 10:3).

This call to holiness is fully realized in the term sanctification.  The term sanctification is used, as pointed out by Vine, of (a) separation to God; (b) the course of life befitting those so separated. (pg. 317).

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Sanctify God in Your Heart

“But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts, and always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is in you, with meekness and fear” (1 Peter 3:15).

Peter’s text expresses the fundamental nature of discipleship.  The term sanctify (hagiazo) is defined by Arndt and Gingrich as “treat as holy, reverence.” Thayer states “to render or acknowledge to be venerable, to hallow.” The Lord God is to be enthroned in our heart.  Such veneration is logical, as He is Lord.  A failure to reverence Him is a failure in discipleship.

The text is very similar to a passage found in the book of Isaiah.  The King James version renders Isaiah 8:13, “Sanctify the LORD of hosts himself; and let him be your fear, and let him be your dread.” A contrast is here made between men and God.  God is the one to be feared.  He is the one we are to concern ourselves with, rather than men.  The Christian ought never to make decisions based upon what men think.  Rather, our sole concern should be to please God.  Jesus said, “And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. But rather fear Him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell” (Matthew 10:28).

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Justification – Sanctification Difference

Authors: Bobby Holmes and Mark Roberts

I. Error

    • 1. “Justification is done by God, makes one right with Him. Sanctification is an ongoing process wrought by the Spirit.”
      1. Romans 5:1-5, 17; 8:1ff
      2. 1 Thessalonians 4:3-4
      3. 2 Thessalonians 2:13
  • A. Neo-Calvinists: B. Passages Misused

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Theme Editorial: “Be An Example … In Purity”

“Let no one despise your youth, but be an example to the believers in word, in conduct, in love, in spirit, in faith, in purity. Till I come, give attention to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine. Do not neglect the gift that is in you, which was given to you by prophecy with the laying on of the hands of the eldership. Meditate on these things; give yourself entirely to them, that your progress may be evident to all. Take heed to yourself and to the doctrine. Continue in them, for in doing this you will save both yourself and those who hear you” (1 Timothy 4:12-16).

The preceding paragraph of instructions, given by the great Apostle Paul to Timothy, his “son in the faith”, contains much of benefit to all who wear the name of our Lord. The call to diligence in doctrine, love and morality are not exclusive to young evangelists. Rather they are needed for all who would be followers of God. Continue reading » Theme Editorial: “Be An Example … In Purity”

God’s Holiness and Our Sanctification

Authors Note: The following outline was inspired by a lecture by Marty Pickup during the 1996 Florida Lectures. Much of the material in the first part of the outline is derived in part from a review of that lecture. The applications at the end of the lesson are my own. I believe that an application of the fundamental principle of Sanctification would go a long way toward solving the moral and doctrinal problems that presently trouble the people of God. It is to a very great extent a failure to recognize and heed the call to holiness which is the cause for the present troubles. As such, I believe the following study to be important and timely. Continue reading » God’s Holiness and Our Sanctification